About

Tarski is a WordPress theme by Ben Eastaugh and Chris Sternal-Johnson.

Flexible and customisable, Tarski was created with blog authors in mind: it’s easy to install and personalise. However, Tarski is also highly extensible and employs a number of innovative features which the more technically-minded can take advantage of. Its clean and well-documented code provides an excellent basis for more extensive modifications.

Coming with a choice of header artwork, numerous options are accessible via a simple, easy-to-use options page. If you run into problems, the documentation should provide the answers you need, and the developers are active on the forum.

Free

Tarski is free. Free as in beer, because we don’t charge anything, and free as in speech, because it’s released under the GPL. If you like Tarski, Ben’s always happy to receive something from his Amazon wishlist (please make sure you include your email address in any message, otherwise he won’t know who to thank).

People

Ben Eastaugh

Ben originally designed Tarski as a theme for his website. After several months of people bugging him to release it as a public theme, he gave in, but decided it needed a thorough reworking first. That’s when he asked Chris to help out. Everything went downhill from there.

Chris Sternal-Johnson

Chris, or ‘ceejayoz’, is the guy to blame for Tarski’s spaghetti code. (Chris’s note: Well, originally. Ben has refactored most of this by now, into very pretty code…) Chris is a web developer living in Rochester, New York. His personal weblog is ceejayoz.com. Chris spent 98% of his time on Tarski removing excess line breaks from Ben’s code.

Martin Koza

Every now and then, Ben nudges Martin, after which he will usually create a new header. He is studying geophysics in Vienna, Austria, and creates digital art as a hobby.

The real Tarski

Tarski is named for Alfred Tarski, one of the greatest logicians of the 20th century, and the father of formal theories of semantics. He is best known for his groundbreaking theory of truth.

If you’re interested in reading more about him, we recommend the biography Alfred Tarski: Life and Logic by Anita Burdman Feferman and Solomon Feferman.